1/27/2022 Fayette County COVID update

The last update was 1/20/2022. These numbers reflect the activity for a 7-day period ending 1/27/2022.

COVID-19 vaccinations
13,240 started (46% of eligible population)
12,200 completed (43% of eligible population)
5615 additional doses

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths
7362 cases (+476)
464 hospitalizations (+12)
95 deaths (+8)
5873 presumed recovered (+324)

Test Positivity Rate: 37.9% (+8.6%)  14-day period ending 1/18/2022

Cases Per 100,000: 3130.6 (high community transmission) 14-day period ending 1/27/2022

Data Source: Ohio Department of Health

For updated data and graphs showing the 7-day averages for cases, hospitalizations and testing, see the CDC COVID Data Tracker.

Schedule a COVID-19 vaccination or booster by calling 740-335-5910 or visiting faycohd.org/events.

1/20/2022 Fayette County COVID Update

Fayette County is experiencing an unprecedented surge of COVID-19 cases. Please see the charts that accompany today’s COVID update for details.

The last update was 1/13/2022. These numbers reflect the activity reported in the past 7 days.

COVID-19 vaccinations
13,165 started (46% of eligible population)
12,119 completed (42% of eligible population)
5459 additional doses

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths
6886 cases (+674)
452 hospitalizations (+11)
87 deaths (+2)
5549 presumed recovered (+204)

Test Positivity Rate:  29.3% (+3.4%)

Cases Per 100,000: 3207.7 (high community transmission)

Data is for the two-week period from 1/6/2022 to 1/19/2022
Data source: CDC COVID DataTracker
Data source: CDC COVID DataTracker
Data source: CDC COVID DataTracker
Data source: ODH COVID-19 Dashboard
Data source: ODH COVID-19 Dashboard

1/14/2022 – FCPH Press Release: COVID transmission extremely high; please take extra precautions

As of Thursday, Fayette County’s two-week average for COVID cases is 21 times higher than the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s benchmark for high community spread. 

The CDC defines high community transmission as 100 cases per 100,000 people. This benchmark, noted Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, MD, MBA, director of the Ohio Department of Health, “has been helpful in allowing us to see the extent to which the virus impacts our community at a particular point in time.” 

Fayette County is reporting 2177.0 cases per 100,000 people and a 25.9% test positivity rate. The statewide average is just under 2000 per 100,000 people.

“With more and more people using over-the-counter at-home COVID tests, it is safe to presume that the number of residents infected is actually higher than we are reporting. We are advising residents to assume that you have been exposed or you have a high potential to be exposed to COVID during this current surge,” said Leigh Cannon, MPH, deputy health commissioner at Fayette County Public Health “and we ask that you consider taking extra precautions at this time.”

Cannon asks that all residents, regardless of their usual routines around COVID, take this current surge to heart.

“We will continue to provide updates, and we cannot wait to share when we are on the other side of this,” Cannon said, “but for THIS moment in time – for the sake of our friends, family and neighbors who are immunocompromised or have underlying conditions, and for the sake of our overburdened healthcare systems and especially the healthcare workers, please, please consider taking extra precautions for the next few weeks.”

“I cannot emphasize enough that this is a time to limit unnecessary activities, correctly wear a well-fitting mask in public, and get vaccinated,” Cannon said.

“No one is untouchable,” Vanderhoff said when addressing Ohioans on Thursday. “Don’t underestimate this variant,” he said, referring to the Omicron variant that has been sweeping through Ohio, “fueling what is nothing short of a tidal wave.”

During the conference, Vanderhoff explained that Ohio is experiencing stress on hospital systems and unprecedented demands for testing. For hospitalizations, there is a widening gap between the vaccinated and unvaccinated. The most severe cases are still mostly among the unvaccinated, he said.

During periods of high transmission, CDC recommends that everyone should wear a mask in public, indoor settings (including vaccinated individuals).

The following is recommended during this period of high transmission:

✅  Wear a well-fitting mask that covers your nose and mouth wherever possible, particularly in public settings and when you are with individuals who are not household members.

✅ Get the COVID vaccine as well as a booster.

✅ Continue to practice social distancing by keeping 6 feet away from others.

✅ Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated indoor spaces.

✅ Stay home when sick, except to seek medical care.

✅ Consider limiting unnecessary indoor activities

If you are immunocompromised or have an immunocompromised individual in your household, please consider taking additional precautions by limiting unnecessary activities until community transmission decreases.

COVID Testing 

Fayette County Public Health is out of at-home test kits and does not provide COVID testing at the health department. The Ohio Department of Health announced this week that they will prioritize the state’s supply of COVID-19 tests to first support testing for K-12 schools and colleges/universities. This comes as the state is experiencing a delay in shipment of more than 800,000 testing kits amid a nationwide shortage in COVID-19 testing supplies.

COVID-19 tests are a critical tool to help ensure in-person learning can continue in Ohio schools. Ongoing access to these tests helps ensure students and teachers can remain in the classroom. Because schools are experiencing significant new demand for tests as COVID-19 cases continue to climb, the state is temporarily adjusting its allocation strategy to ensure schools receive an adequate supply. As a result, the state is pausing shipments to other community partners, including libraries and local health departments, until inventory and the supply chain have stabilized.

As tests become available after the urgent needs of K-12 schools and higher education institutions are met, the state will again send tests to libraries and local health departments to distribute. The state will continue to purchase and distribute these tests to make testing as accessible as possible to Ohioans.

Tests are available from other sources statewide. Over-the-counter rapid testing kits can still be purchased at many locations, such as pharmacies and grocery stores. Testing is also available at many urgent care locations, community health centers, retail locations, and pop-up sites. The ODH website features a searchable map of testing locations at https://bit.ly/odhtest.

Each testing location has its own inventory controls and protocols. When you find a testing location, it’s important to call in advance to ensure tests are available and to determine how to access tests.

Testing is an important tool, but only one of the tools available to help protect against COVID-19. Ohioans are urged to follow proven prevention measures to help prevent further spread of the virus. The best thing that Ohioans can do is to stay up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations. Vaccinations, including timely boosters, combined with masking, social distancing, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick, can help prevent illness and the need for possible testing.

Vaccinations 

COVID-19 vaccines are widely available throughout the state. Many providers offer walk-in appointments, or Ohioans can schedule a vaccination appointment at gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. Ohioans who want to learn more about the safety, efficacy, and side effects of COVID-19 vaccines should talk to their doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, or visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/vaccine.

COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters provide protection against severe disease, hospitalizations and death. There is no cost for a COVID vaccine. Appointments and masks are required for all clinics. Please bring your COVID Vaccination Record if you have already received at least one dose and your health insurance card if you are getting a flu shot.

Vaccination Clinic Schedule Week of 1/17-1/21

January 17-  FCPH closed in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day

January 18 – All three COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, flu and high-dose flu from 3-7 p.m. at Fayette County fairgrounds. Schedule online at faycohd.org/events or by phone – 740-335-5910.

January 19 – Johnson & Johnson 1st dose or booster, call 740-335-5910 to schedule.

January 21 –  Pfizer 1st or 2nd dose, booster, pediatric, call 740-335-5910 to schedule.

Dashboard

COVID-19 vaccinations

In Fayette County, 13,066 (46% of eligible population) have started a vaccination series.
Twelve thousand and forty-six have completed their vaccination series (42% of eligible population). There have been 5273 boosters or additional doses given.

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths

Fayette County Public Health received reports of 338 new COVID cases over the past week, for a total of 6212 cases since the pandemic began.

Nine new hospitalizations were reported for a total of 441 and five new deaths were reported over the past week for a total of 85. 

The number of residents who are presumed recovered is 5345.

For more information, visit faycohd.org.

1/14/2022 – ODH Press Release – New COVID-19 Cases Inflated as Backlog of Positive COVID-19 Test Results Clears

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Department of Health will today, and for the next several days, report an artificially high COVID-19 case count caused by a processing lag due to the unprecedented number of cases reported. A processing enhancement was implemented late Thursday to expand the state’s capacity to process a higher volume of lab results, enabling the backlog to begin to clear and to better keep up with daily processing of positive test results.

Testing data from laboratories across the state is automatically submitted to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) through an electronic lab reporting system that feeds into the Ohio Disease Reporting System (ODRS). As COVID-19 cases have reached all-time highs, driven largely by the highly contagious Omicron variant, the system reached its processing capacity, resulting in a multiple-day backlog of tens of thousands of results. In addition, there are some positive test results that involve a further manual review by state epidemiologists.

As these results are processed, positive cases will be attributed to their proper illness onset date on the COVID-19 overview dashboard, which better depicts the spread of COVID-19 in Ohio. The most helpful indicators of COVID-19 spread in Ohio continue to be COVID-19 hospitalizationstest positivitycase rates per 100,000 residents, and cases by illness onset date.

Throughout the pandemic, the Ohio Department has discovered the impacts of high user demand on antiquated technical systems. ODH continues to take steps to enhance real-time data analysis.

COVID-19 vaccines continue to be the best tool against the virus. Ensuring vaccines are up-to-date is critical to having the best protection possible. COVID-19 vaccines are widely available throughout the state. Many providers offer walk-in appointments, or Ohioans can schedule a vaccination appointment at gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. Ohioans who want to learn more about the safety, efficacy, and side effects of COVID-19 vaccines should talk to their doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, or visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/vaccine.

1/13/2022 – Fayette County COVID Update

1/13/2022

COVID-19 vaccinations

13,066 started (46% of eligible population)
12,046 completed (42% of eligible population)
5273 additional doses

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths

6212 cases (+338)
441 hospitalizations (+9)
85 deaths (+5)
5345 presumed recovered

Test Positivity Rate:  25.9%

Cases Per 100,000: 2177.0 (high community transmission)

1/12/2022 – ODH Press Release: COVID-19 Testing Supplies for Ohio’s K-12 Schools, Colleges, and Universities

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) is announcing plans to prioritize the state’s supply of COVID-19 tests to first support testing for K-12 schools and colleges/universities. This comes as the state is experiencing a delay in the shipment of more than 800,000 testing kits amid a nationwide shortage in COVID-19 testing supplies.

ODH has been making available both the proctored rapid Abbott BinaxNow at-home antigen tests and over-the-counter self-administered tests free to Ohioans at local health departments, public libraries, schools, and other locations. Ohio was one of the first states to prioritize widespread distribution of free rapid testing kits and has distributed about 5.6 million free testing kits – 1.4 million in December alone.

ODH ordered 1.2 million proctored testing kits for January. So far, 400,000 proctored testing kits have been received and are being distributed. Shipment of the remaining 800,000 proctored testing kits has been delayed by the manufacturer as demand for these tests has increased nationwide during the Omicron-driven surge in COVID-19 cases. ODH anticipates receiving shipments later this month. As supply becomes available, the rapid testing kits will first be distributed to meet the needs of K-12 schools and colleges/universities.

COVID-19 tests are a critical tool to help ensure in-person learning can continue in Ohio schools. Ongoing access to these tests helps ensure students and teachers can remain in the classroom. Because schools are experiencing significant new demand for tests as COVID-19 cases continue to climb, the state is temporarily adjusting its allocation strategy to ensure schools receive an adequate supply. As a result, the state is pausing shipments to other community partners, including libraries and local health departments, until inventory and the supply chain have stabilized.

As tests become available after the urgent needs of K-12 schools and higher education institutions are met, the state will again send tests to libraries and local health departments to distribute. Existing and new requests will be processed in the order in which they are received. The state will continue to purchase and distribute these tests to make testing as accessible as possible to Ohioans.

The overall demand for testing in Ohio is exceptionally high, with a seven-day average of more than 94,000 tests per day. 

It’s important to note that tests are available from many sources statewide. While testing supply chains are challenged, over-the-counter rapid testing kits can still be purchased at many locations, such as pharmacies and grocery stores. Testing is also available at many urgent care locations, community health centers, retail locations, and pop-up sites. The ODH website features a searchable map of testing locations at https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/dashboards/other-resources/testing-ch-centers

Each testing location has its own inventory controls and protocols. When you find a testing location, it’s important to call in advance to ensure tests are available and to determine how to access tests.

Testing is an important tool, but only one of the tools available to help protect against COVID-19. Ohioans are urged to follow proven prevention measures to help prevent further spread of the virus. The best thing that Ohioans can do is to stay up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations. Vaccinations, including timely boosters, combined with masking, social distancing, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick, can help prevent illness and the need for possible testing.

COVID-19 vaccines are widely available throughout the state. Many providers offer walk-in appointments, or Ohioans can schedule a vaccination appointment at gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. Ohioans who want to learn more about the safety, efficacy, and side effects of COVID-19 vaccines should talk to their doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, or visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/vaccine.

1/11/2022 – ODH Press Release: Testing Locations with Support from Ohio National Guard

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today announced additional Guard deployments to support COVID-19 testing locations across the state, including three testing locations in Cincinnati.

“We are grateful that National Guard members are continuing to fill critical roles in our state’s response to this pandemic, especially as the strain on our health care providers continues,” said Governor DeWine. “As cases increase across the state, the best thing Ohioans can do is to stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccine.”

The National Guard is now supporting 12 testing locations across the state as part of ongoing efforts to ease some of the burden on the state’s hardest-hit hospitals as Ohio is experiencing the highest number of COVID-19 driven inpatient hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and patients on ventilators seen throughout the pandemic.

Today, the Ohio Hospital Association reported 6,727 inpatient hospitalizations.

At this time, the Ohio National Guard has been deployed to support the following testing locations:
• Akron: Atrium Testing Site (Summa Health), 1077 Gorge Blvd., Akron.
• Canton: (Aultman/Cleveland Clinic Mercy), Stark County Fairgrounds, 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton
• Chillicothe: Adena Regional Medical Center, 272 Hospital Road, Chillicothe
• Cleveland: Walker Center (Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals), 10524 Euclid Ave., Cleveland.
• Columbus: (Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center), first floor of the CAS parking garage at 2540 Olentangy River Road, Columbus.
• Dayton: (Premier Health) Miami Valley Hospital, 1 Wyoming St., Dayton
• Mansfield: Avita Ontario Hospital, 715 Richland Mall, Mansfield
• Maumee: Lucas County Recreation Center, 2901 Key St., Maumee
• Zanesville: Genesis Hospital, 2951 Maple Ave., Zanesville
• Cincinnati: (Ethos Laboratories), Crossroads Church, 990 Reading Road, Mason
• Cincinnati: (Ethos Laboratories), Riverbend, 6201 Kellogg Ave.
• Cincinnati: University of Cincinnati, 321 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati.
COMING SOON:• Dayton: Dayton Children’s Hospital, 1 Children’s Plaza, Dayton

1/6/2022 – FCPH COVID Update

COVID-19 vaccinations
12,979 started (46% of eligible population)
11,995 completed (42% of eligible population)
5082 additional doses

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths
5874 cases
432 hospitalizations
80 deaths

Test Positivity Rate: 19.2%
Cases Per 100,000: 1542.5 (high community transmission)

New Contact Procedure for Positive COVID Cases

Fayette County Public Health implemented a new procedure on 1/6/2022 to notify people who test positive for COVID-19.

County residents who test positive for COVID-19 will receive an automated phone call with the following script:

“You are receiving this call from Fayette County Public Health because we have been notified of a positive COVID-19 result for you or someone within your care.

We are asking you to log in to the Fayette County Public Health website at www.faycohd.org and click on the red button at the top of the page to complete the case survey. 

This allows the FCPH staff to gather the information that they need and they will also use this to complete your letter with your isolation dates.   

Please remember to isolate for at least 5 days after your positive test results or from the day that symptoms started.  If symptoms have resolved or you are asymptomatic you can leave your house while wearing a mask when around anyone else.  If you are still having symptoms please remain at home until they have resolved.

Our website also has a printable quarantine letter that can be given to your close contacts. We will not be sending a letter to them with dates. If you have any additional questions, please contact us at 740-335-5910.”

FCPH typically does not receive positive test results from labs or healthcare providers for 1-2 days after the person testing positive receives their results. During a surge, this may take longer. Staff asks that you be patient while waiting for the automated call, or for faster service, visit the website at faycohd.org for the same instructions.

Fayette County Public Health has also updated the website with the most recent quarantine and isolation guidance from the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control. That information is also available at faycohd.org.

Ohio’s Zone 2 Postpones Non-Essential Surgeries 

Central Ohio Trauma System (COTS) announced on Thursday that in the last few weeks, we have seen an unprecedented surge of new COVID-19 cases in Central, Southeast, and Southeast Central Ohio due to the more contagious Omicron variant. The resulting increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations has stretched our hospital resources to the maximum.

Because of this, all of our adult hospitals in Zone 2 have mutually agreed to postpone non-essential surgical procedures requiring an overnight stay through January 21, 2022. Essential surgeries to prevent death, prevent permanent limb or organ injury, to prevent the progression of cancer and to prevent the progression to severe pain will continue as normally scheduled. 

Each hospital will develop a process to identify which cases will be postponed and to notify patients, but the result will be the same, more beds to care for our seriously ill and injured in our Central, Southeast, and Southeast Central Ohio region. Our hospitals remain committed to serving the healthcare needs of our communities as best we can during this unprecedented time.

Zone 2 includes Regions 4, 7, and 8. The following counties are included in this zone: Fayette, Ross, Pickaway, Wyandot, Crawford, Hardin, Logan, Marion, Morrow, Logan, Union, Delaware, Knox, Madison, Franklin, Licking, Fairfield, Coshocton, Muskingum, Perry, Morgan, Hocking, Pike, Vinton, Athens, Meigs, Jackson, Pike, Jackson, Scioto, Gallia, Lawrence, Washington, Nobel, Monroe, Guernsey, Belmont, Harrison, and Jefferson.